TY - JOUR T1 - Context-led capacity building in time of crisis: fostering non-communicable diseases (NCD) research skills in the Mediterranean Middle East and North Africa JF - Global Health Action Y1 - 2019 A1 - Peter Phillimore A1 - Abla M. Sibai A1 - Anthony Rizk A1 - Wasim Maziak A1 - Belgin Unal A1 - Niveen Abu Rmeileh A1 - Habiba Ben Romdhane A1 - Fouad M. Fouad A1 - Yousef Khader A1 - Kathleen Bennett A1 - Shahaduz Zaman A1 - Awad Mataria A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Bülent Kılıç A1 - Nadia Ben Mansour A1 - Ibtihal Fadhil A1 - Martin A1 - Simon Capewell A1 - Julia A. Critchley VL - 12 UR - https://doi.org/10.1080/16549716.2019.1569838 IS - 1 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Fathers detained, contact restrained: Experiences of Palestinian children visiting their fathers in Israeli detention JF - Child Abuse & Neglect Y1 - 2019 A1 - Mahasin Saleha A1 - Yoke Rabaia A1 - Corey Balsam A1 - Zeina Amro A1 - Samar Kassis VL - 96 IS - 104071 ER - TY - RPRT T1 - Tobacco Use among Birzeit University Faculty and Staff: A Pilot Investigation Y1 - 2019 A1 - Reem Ladadwa A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Abdullatif Husseini A1 - Steven Bernstein A1 - Hani Mowafi A1 - Fuad Abujarad PB - Institute of Community and Public Health CY - Ramallah, Palestine ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Long-Term Health Consequences of Movement Restrictions for Palestinians, 1987–2011 JF - AJPH RESEARCH Y1 - 2018 A1 - Clea A. McNeely A1 - Brian K. Barber A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Robert F. Belli A1 - Mahmoud Daher VL - 108 IS - 1 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - New leadership for the WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean: exceptional election in an exceptional time JF - The Lancet Y1 - 2018 A1 - Samer Jabbour A1 - Sameen Siddiqi A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Hani Serag A1 - Jawad Al-Lawati A1 - Amirhossein Takian A1 - Habiba Ben Romdhane A1 - Elsheikh Badr A1 - Laith J Abu-Raddad A1 - Aida Seif El-Dawla A1 - Salwa Najjab A1 - Driss Moussaoui A1 - Mustafa Khogali A1 - Yousef Khader A1 - Bothaina Attal A1 - Iman Nuwayhid ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Health research in a turbulent region: the Reproductive Health Working Group Y1 - 2017 A1 - Jocelyn DeJong A1 - Huda Zurayk A1 - Cynthia Myntti A1 - Belgin Tekçe A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Hyam Bashour A1 - Atf Ghérissi A1 - Noha Gaballah VL - 25 UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09688080.2017.1379864 IS - 1 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review JF - BMJ Open Y1 - 2017 A1 - Loai Albarqouni A1 - Niveen ME Abu-Rmeileh A1 - Khamis Elessi A1 - Mohammad Obeidallah A1 - Espen Bjertness A1 - Iain Chalmers VL - 7 UR - http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/bmjopen/7/6/e016455.full.pdf ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Women’s health in the occupied Palestinian territories: Contextual influences on subjective and objective health measures JF - PLoS ONE Y1 - 2017 A1 - Katie Bates A1 - Tiziana Leone A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Suzan Mitwalli A1 - Shiraz Nasr A1 - Ernestina Coast A1 - Rita Giacaman VL - 12 UR - http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/related?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0186610 IS - 10 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Cancer mortality in the West Bank, Occupied Palestinian Territory JF - Bio Med Central Public Health Y1 - 2016 A1 - Niveen M. E. Abu-Rmeileh A1 - Emilio Antonio Luca Gianicolo A1 - Antonella Bruni A1 - Suzan Mitwali A1 - Maurizio Portaluri A1 - Jawad Bitar A1 - Mutaem Hamad A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Maria Angela Vigotti VL - 16 IS - 01 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Contrasting cardiovascular mortality trends in Eastern Mediterranean populations: Contributions from risk factor changes and treatments JF - International Journal of Cardiology Y1 - 2016 A1 - Julia Critchley A1 - Simon Capewell A1 - Martin O'Flaherty A1 - Niveen Abu-Rmeileh A1 - Samer Rastam A1 - Olfa Saidi A1 - Kaan Sözmen A1 - Azza Shoaibi A1 - Abdullatif Husseini A1 - Fouad Fouad A1 - Nadia Ben Mansour A1 - Wafa Aissi A1 - Habiba Ben Romdhane A1 - Belgin Unal A1 - Piotr Bandosz A1 - Kathleen Bennett A1 - Mukesh Dherani A1 - Radwan Al Ali A1 - Wasim Maziak A1 - Hale Arýk A1 - Gul Gerceklioolu A1 - Deniz Utku Altun A1 - Hatice Şimşek A1 - Sinem Doganay A1 - Yücel Demiral A1 - Özgür Aslan A1 - Nigel Unwin A1 - Peter Phillimore IS - 208 ER - TY - Generic T1 - Health problems reported by 15-54 years old women two weeks preceding the Family Health Survey 2010 Y1 - 2016 A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Katie Bates A1 - Sawsan Imseeh A1 - Suzan Mitwalli A1 - Shiraz Nasr A1 - Ernestina Coast A1 - Tiziana Leone A1 - Rita Giacaman PB - The Institute of Community and Public Health CY - Ramallah, Palestine ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Mental Suffering in Protracted Political Conflict: Feeling Broken or Destroyed JF - PLOS One Y1 - 2016 A1 - Brian K Barber A1 - Clea McNealy A1 - Eyad El Sarraj A1 - Mahmoud Daher A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Cairo Arafat A1 - William Barnes A1 - Mohammed Abu Mallouh VL - 11 IS - 5 ER - TY - RPRT T1 - A People in Danger: Effects on Health of the 2014 Israeli Offensive on the Gaza Strip -English Y1 - 2016 A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Niveen Abu Rmeileh A1 - Marwan Khawaja A1 - Rabih Bashour A1 - Raffi Shirinian PB - United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) CY - Beirut, Lebanon UR - https://www.unescwa.org/sites/www.unescwa.org/files/publications/files/people-danger-effects-health.pdf ER - TY - RPRT T1 - A People in Danger: Effects on Health of the 2014 Israeli Offensive on the Gaza Strip - Arabic Y1 - 2016 A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Niveen Abu Rmeileh A1 - Marwan Khawaja A1 - Rabih Bashour A1 - Raffi Shirinian PB - United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) CY - Beirut, Lebanon ER - TY - Generic T1 - The prevalence of reported anemia and its determinants among 15-54 years old Palestinian women Y1 - 2016 A1 - Shiraz Nasr A1 - Suzan Mitwalli A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Katie Bates A1 - Sawsan Imseeh A1 - Ernestina Coast A1 - Tiziana Leone A1 - Rita Giacaman PB - The Institute of Community and Public Health CY - Ramallah, Palestine ER - TY - Generic T1 - Self-rated health of 15-54 years old women Y1 - 2016 A1 - Suzan Mitwalli A1 - Katie Bates A1 - Rula Ghandour A1 - Sawsan Imseeh A1 - Shiraz Nasr A1 - Ernestina Coast A1 - Tiziana Leone A1 - Rita Giacaman PB - The Institute of Community and Public Health CY - Ramallah, Palestine ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Whither the “Children of the Stone”? An Entire Life under Occupation JF - Journal of Palestine Studies Y1 - 2016 A1 - Brian K Barber A1 - Clea McNeely A1 - Chenoa Allen A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Cairo Arafat A1 - Mahmoud Daher A1 - Eyad El-Sarraj A1 - Mohammed Abu Mallouh A1 - Robert F Belli VL - 45 IS - 178 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - A cross sectional study of maternal ‘near-miss’ cases in major public hospitals in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria JF - Pregnancy and Childbirth Y1 - 2015 A1 - Hyam Bashour A1 - Ghada Saad-Haddad A1 - Jocelyn DeJong A1 - Mohammed Cherine Ramadan A1 - Sahar Hassan A1 - Miral Breebaart A1 - Laura Wick A1 - Nevine Hassanein A1 - Mayada Kharouf AB -

 

VL - 15 UR - http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/s12884-015-0733-7.pdf IS - 296 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - A cost effectiveness analysis of salt reduction policies to reduce coronary heart disease in four eastern Mediterranean countries JF - PLOS Y1 - 2014 A1 - Mason, H. A1 - Shoaibi, A. A1 - Ghandour, Rula. A1 - O'Flaherty, M. A1 - Capewell, M. A1 - Khatib, R. A1 - Jabr, S. A1 - Unal B. A1 - Sozmen, K. A1 - Arfa, W. A1 - Ben Romdhane, H. A1 - Fouad, F. A1 - Al-Ali, R. A1 - Husseini, Abdullatif. U1 -

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ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Human insecurity, chronic economic constraints and health in the occupied Palestinian territory JF - Global Public Health: An International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice Y1 - 2014 A1 - McNeely, Clea. A1 - Barber, Brian K. A1 - Spellings, Carolyn. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Arafat, Cairo. A1 - Daher, Mahmoud. A1 - El Sarraj and Abu Mallouh, Mm. U1 -

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Together with Hanna Kienzler from the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine at King’s College London, the Mental...

The Institute of Community and Public Health participated as facilitators in the protocol development workshop (IRP) as part of...

The ICPH director participated in the fourth seminar on " Health Diplomacy" that was Cairo, Egypt, 2-4 MAY 2015.

 
ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Politics drives human functioning, dignity, and quality of life JF - Social Science & Medicine Y1 - 2014 A1 - Brian K. Barber A1 - Carolyn Spellings A1 - Clea McNeely A1 - Paul D. Page A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Cairo Arafat A1 - Mahmoud Daher A1 - Eyad El Sarraj A1 - Mohammed Abu Mallouh VL - 122 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Priority setting for the prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases: multi - criteria decision analysis in four estern mediterranean countries JF - international journal of public health Y1 - 2014 A1 - Ghandour, Rula. A1 - Shoaibi, Azza. A1 - Khatib, Rana. A1 - Abu Rmeileh, Niveen. A1 - Unal, B. A1 - Sozmen, K. A1 - Kilic, B. A1 - Fouad, F. A1 - Al Ali, R. A1 - Ben Romdhane, H. A1 - Aissi, W. A1 - Ahmad, Balsam. A1 - Capewell, S. A1 - Critchley and Husseini, A. U1 -

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ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Medicalisation of childbirth in the occupied Palestinian territory: an operational study JF - The Lancet Y1 - 2013 A1 - Hassan, Sahar. A1 - Sundby, Johanne. A1 - Husseini, Abdullatif. A1 - Bjertness, Espen. VL - 382 SN - 0140-6736 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Prediction of health with human insecurity and chronic economic constraints in the occupied Palestinian territory: a cross-sectional survey JF - The Lancet Y1 - 2013 A1 - McNeely, Clea. A1 - Barber, Brian K. A1 - Spellings, Carolyn. A1 - Giacaman, Rita. A1 - Arafat, Cairo. A1 - El Sarraj, Eyad. A1 - Daher, Mahmoud. A1 - Mallouh, Mohammed Abu. VL - 382 SN - 0140-6736 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Tobacco in the Arab World: old and new epidemics amidst policy paralysis JF - Health Policy and Planning Y1 - 2013 A1 - Maziak, W. A1 - Nakkash, R. A1 - Bahelah, R. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Fanous, N. A1 - Eissenberg, T. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean studies of cardiovascular disease and hyperglycemia: analytical modeling of population socio-economic transitions (MedCHAPMS)- rationale and methods JF - Int J Public Health Y1 - 2012 A1 - Maziak, W. A1 - Critchley, J. A1 - Zaman, S. A1 - Unwin, N. A1 - Capwell, S. A1 - Bennett, K. A1 - Unal, B. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Ben, R. A1 - Phillimore, P. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Palestinian Women’s feelings and opinions about vaginal examinations during normal childbirth: an exploratory study JF - Lancet Y1 - 2012 A1 - Hassan, Sahar. A1 - Sundby, Johanne. A1 - Husseini, Abed. A1 - Bjertness, E. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - The paradox of vaginal examination practice during normal childbirth: palestinian women's feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences JF - Reprod Health Y1 - 2012 A1 - Hassan, Sahar. A1 - Sundby, Johanne. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Bjertness, E. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Use of evidence to support health public policy: a policy effectiveness – feasibility loop JF - Bull World Health Organ Y1 - 2012 A1 - Bowman, S. A1 - Unwin, N. A1 - Critchley, J. A1 - Husseini, A. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Mental health, social distress and political oppression: The case of the occupied Palestinian territory JF - Global Public Health Y1 - 2011 A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Rabaia, Y. A1 - Nguyen-Gillham, V. A1 - Batniji, R. A1 - Punamaki, R. L. A1 - Summerfield, D. AB -

This paper presents a brief history of Palestinian mental health care, a discussion of the current status of mental health and health services in the occupied Palestinian territory, and a critique of the biomedical Western-led discourse as it relates to the mental health needs of Palestinians. Medicalising distress and providing psychological therapies for Palestinians offer little in the way of alleviating the underlying causes of ongoing collective trauma. This paper emphasises the importance of separating clinical responses to mental illness from the public health response to mass political violation and distress. Palestinian academic research reframes the mental health paradigm utilising an approach based on the broader framework of social justice, quality of life, human rights and human security. Recognising social suffering as a public mental health issue requires a shift in the emphasis from narrow medical indicators, injury and illness to the lack of human security and human rights violations experienced by ordinary Palestinians. Such a change in perspective requires a parallel change in mental health policies from short-term emergency humanitarian aid to the development of a sustainable system of public mental health services, in combination with advocacy for human rights and the restoration of political, historical and moral justice.

SN - 1744-1706 (Electronic)
1744-1692 (Linking) N1 - Journal article
Global public health
Glob Public Health. 2010 Nov 23:1-13. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - 15 years of cooperation in research and higher education between the Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo and Palestinian institutions JF - the Lancet online Y1 - 2010 A1 - Bjertness, E. A1 - Nijem, K. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Giacaman,R. A1 - Holmboe-Ottesen, G. A1 - Kristensen, P. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Child health in the West Bank: Experiences from implementing a paediatric course for Palestinian doctors and nurses working in primary care JF - Med Teach Y1 - 2010 A1 - Morris, A. A1 - Rudolf, M. A1 - Halileh, S. A1 - Odeh, J. A1 - Bowyer, J. A1 - Waterston, T. AB -

Child health issues are of high importance in the occupied Palestinian territories, where half of the population are children. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health have developed a comprehensive paediatric training programme for primary healthcare providers with the aim of improving child health in the area. The course has taken 8 years to develop with the pilot running in 2005-2007 and is now being extended to other centres in the region. In this article, we describe the process through which this course has developed, some of the difficulties faced and the final teaching programme as it has evolved. A number of lessons have been learnt, over the years, which are of potential value to others designing similar teaching programmes. Its greatest strength lies in the partnership developed with local paediatricians, which encourages us to believe that sustainability has been achieved. Evaluation confirms that the course is meeting the needs of local doctors and nurses and improving their paediatric skills. Although developed specifically for the occupied Palestinian territory, our experience offers a process and design for a teaching programme that could be adapted for use in other countries around the world.

VL - 32 SN - 1466-187X (Electronic)
0142-159X (Linking) N1 - Morris, Alistair
Rudolf, Mary
Halileh, Samia
Odeh, Jumana
Bowyer, Jean
Waterston, Tony
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
England
Medical teacher
Med Teach. 2010;32(11):e486-91. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Mental health, social distress and political oppression: The case of the occupied Palestinian territory JF - Glob Public Health Y1 - 2010 A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Rabaia, Y. A1 - Nguyen-Gillham, V. A1 - Batniji, R. A1 - Punamaki, R. L. A1 - Summerfield, D. AB -

This paper presents a brief history of Palestinian mental health care, a discussion of the current status of mental health and health services in the occupied Palestinian territory, and a critique of the biomedical Western-led discourse as it relates to the mental health needs of Palestinians. Medicalising distress and providing psychological therapies for Palestinians offer little in the way of alleviating the underlying causes of ongoing collective trauma. This paper emphasises the importance of separating clinical responses to mental illness from the public health response to mass political violation and distress. Palestinian academic research reframes the mental health paradigm utilising an approach based on the broader framework of social justice, quality of life, human rights and human security. Recognising social suffering as a public mental health issue requires a shift in the emphasis from narrow medical indicators, injury and illness to the lack of human security and human rights violations experienced by ordinary Palestinians. Such a change in perspective requires a parallel change in mental health policies from short-term emergency humanitarian aid to the development of a sustainable system of public mental health services, in combination with advocacy for human rights and the restoration of political, historical and moral justice.

SN - 1744-1706 (Electronic)
1744-1692 (Linking) N1 - Journal article
Global public health
Glob Public Health. 2010 Nov 23:1-13. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - A policy effectiveness-feasibility loop? Promoting the use of evidence to support the development of healthy public policy JF - Epidemiology and Community Health Y1 - 2010 A1 - Unwin, N. A1 - Bennett, K. A1 - Capewell, S. A1 - Critchley, J. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Laherty, MO'F. A1 - Maziak, W. A1 - Mataria, A. A1 - Phillimore, P. A1 - Romdhane, H B. A1 - Unal, B. A1 - Zaman, S. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and cancer in the occupied Palestinian territory JF - Lancet Y1 - 2009 A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Abu-Rmeileh, N. M. A1 - Mikki, N. A1 - Ramahi, T. M. A1 - Ghosh, H. A. A1 - Barghuthi, N. A1 - Khalili, M. A1 - Bjertness, E. A1 - Holmboe-Ottesen, G. A1 - Jervell, J. KW - Adolescent KW - Adult KW - Aged KW - Arabs/*statistics & numerical data KW - Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology/prevention & control KW - Cause of Death KW - Chronic Disease KW - Comorbidity KW - Cost of Illness KW - Delivery of Health Care/economics/trends KW - Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology/prevention & control KW - Female KW - Humans KW - Incidence KW - Israel/epidemiology KW - Life Style KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Neoplasms/classification/*epidemiology/prevention & control KW - Nutritional Status KW - Obesity/epidemiology KW - Quality of Life KW - Risk Factors KW - Smoking/epidemiology KW - Survival Rate KW - Young Adult AB -

Heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the occupied Palestinian territory, resulting in a high direct cost of care, high indirect cost in loss of production, and much societal stress. The rates of the classic risk factors for atherosclerotic disease-namely, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tobacco smoking, and dyslipidaemia-are high and similar to those in neighbouring countries. The urbanisation and continuing nutritional change from a healthy Mediterranean diet to an increasingly western-style diet is associated with reduced activity, obesity, and a loss of the protective effect of the traditional diet. Rates of cancer seem to be lower than those in neighbouring countries, with the leading causes of death being lung cancer in Palestinian men and breast cancer in women. The response of society and the health-care system to this epidemic is inadequate. A large proportion of health-care expenditure is on expensive curative care outside the area. Effective comprehensive prevention programmes should be implemented, and the health-care system should be redesigned to address these diseases.

VL - 373 SN - 1474-547X (Electronic)
0140-6736 (Linking) N1 - Husseini, Abdullatif
Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M E
Mikki, Nahed
Ramahi, Tarik M
Ghosh, Heidar Abu
Barghuthi, Nadim
Khalili, Mohammad
Bjertness, Espen
Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd
Jervell, Jak
England
Lancet
Lancet. 2009 Mar 21;373(9668):1041-9. Epub 2009 Mar 4. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Health as human security in the occupied Palestinian territory JF - Lancet Y1 - 2009 A1 - Batniji, R. A1 - Rabaia, Y. A1 - Nguyen-Gillham, V. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Sarraj, E. A1 - Punamaki, R. L. A1 - Saab, H. A1 - Boyce, W. KW - *Arabs KW - *Human Rights KW - Civil Disorders KW - Health KW - Middle East KW - Safety KW - Sanitation KW - Social Conditions KW - War AB -

We describe the threats to survival, development, and wellbeing in the occupied Palestinian territory using human security as a framework. Palestinian security has deteriorated rapidly since 2000. More than 6000 Palestinians have been killed by the Israeli military, with more than 1300 killed in the Gaza Strip during 22 days of aerial and ground attacks ending in January, 2009. Israeli destruction and control of infrastructure has severely restricted fuel supplies and access to water and sanitation. Palestinians are tortured in prisons and humiliated at Israeli checkpoints. The separation wall and the checkpoints prevent access to work, family, sites of worship, and health-care facilities. Poverty rates have risen sharply, and almost half of Palestinians are dependent on food aid. Social cohesion, which has kept Palestinian society intact, including the health-care system, is now strained. More than US$9 billion in international aid have not promoted development because Palestinians do not have basic security. International efforts focused on prevention of modifiable causes of insecurity, reinvigoration of international norms, support of Palestinian social resilience and institutions that protect them from threats, and a political solution are needed to improve human security in the occupied Palestinian territory.

VL - 373 SN - 1474-547X (Electronic)
0140-6736 (Linking) N1 - Batniji, Rajaie
Rabaia, Yoke
Nguyen-Gillham, Viet
Giacaman, Rita
Sarraj, Eyad
Punamaki, Raija-Leena
Saab, Hana
Boyce, Will
England
Lancet
Lancet. 2009 Mar 28;373(9669):1133-43. Epub 2009 Mar 4. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - The health-care system: an assessment and reform agenda JF - Lancet Y1 - 2009 A1 - Mataria, A. A1 - Khatib, R. A1 - Donaldson, C. A1 - Bossert, T. A1 - Hunter, D. J. A1 - Alsayed, F. A1 - Moatti, J. P. KW - *Health Planning Guidelines KW - Developing Countries KW - Efficiency, Organizational KW - Forecasting KW - Health Care Reform/*organization & administration KW - Health Planning Technical Assistance KW - Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration KW - Health Status Indicators KW - Health Transition KW - Humans KW - Interinstitutional Relations KW - Middle East KW - National Health Programs/*organization & administration KW - Needs Assessment/*organization & administration KW - Organizational Objectives KW - Organizations/organization & administration KW - Politics KW - Relief Work/organization & administration KW - United Nations/organization & administration KW - War AB -

Attempts to establish a health plan for the occupied Palestinian territory were made before the 1993 Oslo Accords. However, the first official national health plan was published in 1994 and aimed to regulate the health sector and integrate the activities of the four main health-care providers: the Palestinian Ministry of Health, Palestinian non-governmental organisations, the UN Relief and Works Agency, and a cautiously developing private sector. However, a decade and a half later, attempts to create an effective, efficient, and equitable system remain unsuccessful. This failure results from arrangements for health care established by the Israeli military government between 1967 and 1994, the nature of the Palestinian National Authority, which has little authority in practice and has been burdened by inefficiency, cronyism, corruption, and the inappropriate priorities repeatedly set to satisfy the preferences of foreign aid donors. Although similar problems exist elsewhere, in the occupied Palestinian territory they are exacerbated and perpetuated under conditions of military occupation. Developmental approaches integrated with responses to emergencies should be advanced to create a more effective, efficient, and equitable health system, but this process would be difficult under military occupation.

VL - 373 SN - 1474-547X (Electronic)
0140-6736 (Linking) N1 - Mataria, Awad
Khatib, Rana
Donaldson, Cam
Bossert, Thomas
Hunter, David J
Alsayed, Fahed
Moatti, Jean-Paul
Review
England
Lancet
Lancet. 2009 Apr 4;373(9670):1207-17. Epub 2009 Mar 4. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Normalising the abnormal: Palestinian youth and the contradictions of resilience
in protracted conflict
JF - Health and Social Care in the Community Y1 - 2008 A1 - Viet Nguyen-Gillham A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Ghada Naser A1 - Will Boyce VL - 16 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Humiliation: the invisible trauma of war for Palestinian youth JF - Public Health Y1 - 2007 A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Abu-Rmeileh, N. M. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Saab, H. A1 - Boyce, W. KW - *Emotions KW - *Health Status KW - *War KW - Adolescent KW - Adolescent Psychology KW - Arabs/*psychology KW - Demography KW - Female KW - Humans KW - Male KW - Sex Factors KW - Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/*psychology KW - Violence/psychology AB -

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of exposure to humiliation in war-like conditions on health status in 10th- and 11th-grade students living in the Ramallah District, West Bank, Occupied Palestinian Territory. STUDY DESIGN: A stratified single-stage cluster sample of 3415 students from cities, towns, villages and refugee camps of the Ramallah District. METHODS: Survey questions were derived from the World Health Organization's Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey, the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme Traumatic Event Checklist, and focus group discussions with young people. The survey questionnaire was completed by students in their classrooms, under the supervision of a trained field worker. RESULTS: There was a significant association between a high number of subjective health complaints and demographic variables, particularly for females compared with males, and refugee camp dwellers compared with village dwellers. In addition, exposure to humiliation was significantly associated with an increased number of subjective health complaints. Students experiencing three forms of humiliation were found to be 2.5 times more likely to report a high number of subjective health complaints compared with those who had never been exposed to humiliation (52% vs 21%), while those experiencing four forms of humiliation were three times more likely to report a high number of subjective health complaints (62% vs 21%). A multiple logistic regression model revealed that humiliation was significantly associated with a high number of subjective health complaints, even after adjusting for sex, residence and other measures of exposure to violent events. The odds ratio of reporting a high number of subjective health complaints increased as the number of forms of humiliation increased, with values of 1.69, 2.67, 4.43 and 7.49 for reporting a high number of subjective health complaints when exposed to one, two, three or four forms of humiliation, respectively, compared with those who had never been exposed to humiliation. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study demonstrate that humiliation induced by conflict and war-like conditions constitutes an independent traumatic event that is associated with negative health outcomes in its own right, regardless of exposure to other violent/traumatic events. Based on these findings, it is proposed that humiliation should be included as an indicator of mental health status in research that investigates the consequences of war and conflict on the health of populations.

VL - 121 SN - 0033-3506 (Print)
0033-3506 (Linking) N1 - Giacaman, Rita
Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M E
Husseini, Abdullatif
Saab, Hana
Boyce, William
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
England
Public health
Public Health. 2007 Aug;121(8):563-71; discussion 572-7. Epub 2007 Jun 12. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Individual and collective exposure to political violence: Palestinian adolescents coping with conflict JF - Eur J Public Health Y1 - 2007 A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Shannon, H. S. A1 - Saab, H. A1 - Arya, N. A1 - Boyce, W. KW - *Adaptation, Psychological KW - *Conflict (Psychology) KW - *Politics KW - *Violence KW - Adolescent KW - Adolescent Psychology KW - Arabs KW - Female KW - Health Surveys KW - Humans KW - Israel KW - Male AB -

BACKGROUND: We conducted a survey of Palestinian adolescents in school. We hypothesized that collective and individual exposures to violence would both negatively affect adolescents' mental health. We also anticipated that the negative effect of collective exposures on mental health would be less than that of individual exposures. Our analysis was designed to test these hypotheses. METHODS: A representative sample of 3415 students of 10th and 11th grades from the Ramallah District of the West Bank participated in the survey. The primary independent variables were scales of individual and collective exposures to trauma/violence (ETV) by the Israeli military and settlers. Factor analysis revealed several sub-scales. Outcome measures were constructed and included: a binary measure of depressive-like states, and emotional, depressive-like state, and somatic scales. Several variables were identified as possible covariates: gender, age, school-type, residence, employment status of father, and identity documents held. RESULTS: Logistic and multiple regression analyses revealed a strong relationship between ETV and adolescents' mental health, with both individual and collective exposures having independent effects. There was a higher prevalence of depressive-like symptoms among girls compared with boys, and in adolescents living in Palestinian refugee camps compared with those living in cities, towns and villages. CONCLUSION: The findings confirmed our hypothesis that both individual and collective ETV independently affect the mental health of adolescents. Contrary to expectations, individual exposures did not consistently have a greater negative effect on health outcomes than collective exposures, although the sub-scale of direct personal exposures to violence consistently showed the strongest effect among sub-scales. The results emphasize the importance of going beyond individual experiences and including the health outcomes of collective violation when analyzing violent and traumatic contexts.

VL - 17 SN - 1101-1262 (Print)
1101-1262 (Linking) N1 - Giacaman, Rita
Shannon, Harry S
Saab, Hana
Arya, Neil
Boyce, Will
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
England
European journal of public health
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):361-8. Epub 2006 Nov 30. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Response to commentary JF - Public Health Y1 - 2007 A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Abu-Rmeileh, N. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Saab, H. A1 - Boyce, W. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Dentists' perceptions of occupational hazards and preventive measures in East Jerusalem JF - East Mediterr Health J Y1 - 2006 A1 - Al-Khatib, I. A. A1 - Ishtayeh, M. A1 - Barghouty, H. A1 - Akkawi, B. KW - *Attitude of Health Personnel KW - *Occupational Exposure/adverse effects/prevention & control KW - Accidents, Occupational/prevention & control/psychology KW - Adaptation, Psychological KW - Burnout, Professional/etiology/*prevention & control/psychology KW - Dentists/organization & administration/*psychology KW - Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice KW - Health Services Needs and Demand KW - Hepatitis B/prevention & control/transmission KW - HIV Infections/prevention & control/transmission KW - Human Engineering KW - Humans KW - Infection Control/methods KW - Infectious Disease Transmission, KW - Interprofessional Relations KW - Israel KW - Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology/prevention & control KW - Occupational Diseases/etiology/*prevention & control KW - Occupational Health KW - Patient-to-Professional/methods/prevention & control KW - Questionnaires KW - Risk Factors KW - Self Care/methods/psychology KW - Taxes KW - Urban Population AB -

Dentists, like other health professionals, are exposed to various occupational health problems, with specific ones of their own. A randomly distributed sample of 40 (42.2%) dentists working in East Jerusalem was interviewed. A questionnaire was used to detect their perception of occupational hazards. Most respondents were aware of biological hazards: 38% specifically mentioned hepatitis B virus and 13% human immunodeficiency virus. Perceived sources of stress included factors that coincided with international data, such as relationships with patients, physical strain and economic pressure, but also some specific to the Palestinian culture such as relationships with other dentists and Israeli occupation tax policy when dealing with the Arab dentists in East Jerusalem. Chemical dependency was not mentioned as a potential hazard.

VL - 12 SN - 1020-3397 (Print)
1020-3397 (Linking) N1 - Al-Khatib, I A
Ishtayeh, M
Barghouty, H
Akkawi, B
Egypt
Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de sante de la Mediterranee orientale = al-Majallah al-sihhiyah li-sharq al-mutawassit
East Mediterr Health J. 2006 Jan-Mar;12(1-2):153-60. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Individual and collective exposure to political violence: Palestinian adolescents coping with conflict JF - European Journal of Public Health Y1 - 2006 A1 - Rita Giacaman A1 - Harry S. Shannon A1 - Hana Saab A1 - Neil Arya A1 - Will Boyce AB -

Background: We conducted a survey of Palestinian adolescents in school. We hypothesized that collective and individual exposures to violence would both negatively affect adolescents' mental health. We also anticipated that the negative effect of collective exposures on mental health would be less than that of individual exposures. Our analysis was designed to test these hypotheses. Methods: A representative sample of 3415 students of 10th and 11th grades from the Ramallah District of the West Bank participated in the survey. The primary independent variables were scales of individual and collective exposures to trauma/violence (ETV) by the Israeli military and settlers. Factor analysis revealed several sub-scales. Outcome measures were constructed and included: a binary measure of depressive-like states, and emotional, depressive-like state, and somatic scales. Several variables were identified as possible covariates: gender, age, school-type, residence, employment status of father, and identity documents held. Results: Logistic and multiple regression analyses revealed a strong relationship between ETV and adolescents' mental health, with both individual and collective exposures having independent effects. There was a higher prevalence of depressive-like symptoms among girls compared with boys, and in adolescents living in Palestinian refugee camps compared with those living in cities, towns and villages. Conclusion: The findings confirmed our hypothesis that both individual and collective ETV independently affect the mental health of adolescents. Contrary to expectations, individual exposures did not consistently have a greater negative effect on health outcomes than collective exposures, although the sub-scale of direct personal exposures to violence consistently showed the strongest effect among sub-scales. The results emphasize the importance of going beyond individual experiences and including the health outcomes of collective violation when analyzing violent and traumatic contexts.

VL - 17 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Routines in facility-based maternity care: evidence from the Arab World JF - International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Y1 - 2005 A1 - Karima Khalil A1 - Hania Sholkamy A1 - Nevine Hassanein A1 - Mohamed Cherine A1 - Amr Elnoury A1 - Lamia Mohsen A1 - Miral Breebaart A1 - Tamar Kabakian-Khasholian A1 - Rawan Shayboub A1 - Rita Khayat A1 - Oona MR Campbell A1 - Hibah Osman A1 - Rima Mourtada A1 - Raghda Hafez A1 - Dima Sinno A1 - Nahed Mikki A1 - Laura Wick A1 - Livia Wick A1 - Hyam Bashour A1 - Asmaa Abdulsalam A1 - Salah Sheikha AB -

OBJECTIVES:

To document facility-based practices for normal labour and delivery in Egypt, Lebanon, the West Bank (part of the Occupied Palestinian Territory) and Syria and to categorise common findings according to evidence-based obstetrics.

DESIGN:

Three studies (Lebanon, West Bank and Syria) interviewed a key informant (providers) in maternity facilities. The study in Egypt directly observed individual labouring women.

SETTING:

Maternity wards.

SAMPLE:

Nationally representative sample of hospitals drawn in Lebanon and Syria. In the West Bank, a convenience sample of hospitals was used. In Egypt, the largest teaching hospital's maternity ward was observed.

METHODS:

Shared practices were categorised by adapting the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2004 classification of practices for normal birth into the following: practices known to be beneficial, practices likely to be beneficial, practices unlikely to be beneficial and practices likely to be ineffective or harmful.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Routine hospital practices for normal labor and delivery.

RESULTS:

There was infrequent use of beneficial practices that should be encouraged and an unexpectedly high level of harmful practices that should be eliminated. Some beneficial practices were applied inappropriately and practices of unproven benefit were also documented. Some documented childbirth practices are potentially harmful to mothers and their babies.

CONCLUSION:

Facility practices for normal labour were largely not in accordance with the WHO evidence-based classification of practices for normal birth. The findings are worrying given the increasing proportion of facility-based births in the region and the improved but relatively high maternal and neonatal mortality ratios in these countries. Obstacles to following evidence-based protocols for normal labour require examination.

PB - Blackwell Science Ltd VL - 112 IS - 9 ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity in a rural and an urban Palestinian West Bank population JF - Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord Y1 - 2003 A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. F. A1 - Holmboe-Ottesen, G. A1 - Stene, L. C. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adipose Tissue KW - Adult KW - Arabs/statistics & numerical data KW - Body Mass Index KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Energy Metabolism KW - Exercise KW - Female KW - Humans KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Obesity/*epidemiology/metabolism KW - Prevalence KW - Regression Analysis KW - Rural Health KW - Urban Health AB -

OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of obesity, household food consumption patterns, physical activity patterns and smoking between a rural and an urban community in the Palestinian West Bank and to describe the associations of the latter factors with body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional survey in a rural and an urban Palestinian West Bank community. SUBJECTS: A total of 549 women and 387 men aged 30-65 y, excluding pregnant women. MEASUREMENTS: Obesity was defined as BMI >/=30 kg/m(2). RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was 36.8 and 18.1% in rural women and men, respectively, compared with 49.1 and 30.6% in urban women and men, respectively. The mean difference (s.e) in BMI levels was 1.6 (0.52) kg/m(2) between urban and rural women and 0.9 (0.46) kg/m(2) in men. At the household level, the mean energy consumption from 25 selected food items was 13.8 MJ (3310 kcal)/consumption unit/day in the rural community compared to 14.5 MJ (3474 kcal)/consumption unit/day in the urban community (P=0.021). BMI was positively associated with age in both men and women and with urban residence in women. BMI was negatively associated with smoking and physical activity in men and with educational level in women. CONCLUSION: BMI was associated with urban residence in women after adjusting for age, smoking, education, physical activity and nutrition-related variables, suggesting that the differences in the conventional determinants of obesity could not fully explain the difference in the prevalence of obesity between the two communities. Among men, the measured determinants explained the rural-urban differences in BMI.

VL - 27 SN - 0307-0565 (Print)
0307-0565 (Linking) N1 - Abdul-Rahim, H F
Holmboe-Ottesen, G
Stene, L C M
Husseini, A
Giacaman, R
Jervell, J
Bjertness, E
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
England
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003 Jan;27(1):140-6. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Selected factors associated with diabetes mellitus in a rural Palestinian community JF - Med Sci Monit Y1 - 2003 A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adult KW - Arabs KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Diabetes Mellitus/blood/*epidemiology/physiopathology KW - Female KW - Humans KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Risk Factors KW - Rural Population AB -

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution and association of selected risk factors for diabetes mellitus in a semi-rural Palestinian village. MATERIAL/METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional, population-based study of 500 adults aged 30 to 65 in a semi-rural Palestinian village. The study included two phases: a household survey and an individual assessment utilizing the oral glucose tolerance test OGTT to determine the diabetes status of the participants, anthropometric measurements for body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR), blood biochemistry measurements for lipids, blood pressure measurement, and a standard questionnaire to assess demographic and other factors. RESULTS: The association between various risk factors and diabetes status was explored by comparing statistical means and proportions and crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR). A multivariate logistic regression using sex and seven factors initially found to be significantly associated with diabetes identified four factors that remained significantly associated with diabetes after adjustment for age and sex. The four main factors are age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI = 1.05-1.12), positive family history of diabetes (OR = 3.09, 95%CI = 1.53-6.24), triglycerides (OR = 1.006, 95%CI = 1.002-1.009), and WHR (OR = 2.13, 95%CI =1.31-3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Two factors associated with diabetes are potentially modifiable in this Palestinian population: WHR and triglyceride levels. These should be addressed by preventive health activities, including health promotion. The association between diabetes and age supports the conclusion that the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase with the aging of the population.

VL - 9 SN - 1234-1010 (Print)
1234-1010 (Linking) N1 - Husseini, Abdullatif
Abdul-Rahim, Hanan
Giacaman, Rita
Jervell, Jak
Bjertness, Espen
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Poland
Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research
Med Sci Monit. 2003 May;9(5):CR181-5. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes mellitus in an urban Palestinian population: prevalence and associated factors JF - East Mediterr Health J Y1 - 2001 A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. F. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adult KW - Age Distribution KW - Aged KW - Body Constitution KW - Body Mass Index KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Diabetes Complications KW - Diabetes Mellitus/blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology/etiology KW - Female KW - Glucose Intolerance/blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology/etiology KW - Glucose Tolerance Test KW - Health Surveys KW - Humans KW - Hypercholesterolemia/complications/epidemiology KW - Hypertension/complications/epidemiology KW - Logistic Models KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Obesity KW - Population Surveillance KW - Prevalence KW - Risk Factors KW - Sex Distribution KW - Urban Population/*statistics & numerical data AB -

We investigated the prevalence of diabetes and associated factors in a cross-sectional survey of an urban Palestinian population of 492 men and women aged 30-65 years. The oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. World Health Organization-recommended survey protocols were followed. Diabetes was found in 12.0% of the survey population (including 9.4% previously diagnosed), and impaired glucose tolerance in 5.9%. Logistic regression analysis controlling for age and sex revealed body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio and family history of diabetes to be significantly independently associated with diabetes.

VL - 7 SN - 1020-3397 (Print)
1020-3397 (Linking) N1 - Abdul-Rahim, H F
Husseini, A
Giacaman, R
Jervell, J
Bjertness, E
Egypt
Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de sante de la Mediterranee orientale = al-Majallah al-sihhiyah li-sharq al-mutawassit
East Mediterr Health J. 2001 Jan-Mar;7(1-2):67-78. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - The metabolic syndrome in the West Bank population: an urban-rural comparison JF - Diabetes Care Y1 - 2001 A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. F. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Bjertness, E. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Gordon, N. H. A1 - Jervell, J. KW - *Insulin Resistance KW - Adult KW - Aged KW - Blood Pressure KW - Body Constitution KW - Body Mass Index KW - Cholesterol, HDL/blood KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Diabetes Complications KW - Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis KW - Female KW - Glucose Intolerance/complications/epidemiology KW - Glucose Tolerance Test KW - Humans KW - Hyperlipidemias/complications/epidemiology KW - Hypertension/complications/epidemiology KW - Hypertriglyceridemia/complications/epidemiology KW - Male KW - Metabolic Diseases/*epidemiology KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Obesity/complications/epidemiology KW - Rural Population KW - Sex Characteristics KW - Smoking KW - Syndrome KW - Urban Population AB -

OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of components of the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension, abnormal glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, central obesity, and overall obesity, between a rural and an urban Palestinian West Bank community. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 500 rural and 492 urban men and women aged 30-65 years participated in a community-based cross-sectional survey Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test. BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure were measured, and blood samples were taken from each subject. Sociodemographic characteristics were investigated using a questionnaire. RESULTS: Hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol, overall obesity, and smoking were significantly more prevalent in the urban population, whereas central obesity was more prevalent in the rural population. Prevalence of hypertension was not significantly different between the rural and urban populations (25.4 and 21.5%, respectively; P = 0.15). The age-adjusted prevalences of diabetes were high: 11.3% (8.5-14.1 95% CI) and 13.9% (10.8-17.0) in the rural and urban populations, respectively, but not significantly different. In each community, the age-adjusted prevalence of the metabolic syndrome as defined by the World Health Organization was 17%. CONCLUSIONS: Although no significant differences were found in the prevalences of hypertension and diabetes between the two populations, other components of the metabolic syndrome, namely elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and overall obesity, were more prevalent in the urban population. Given the rapid urbanization of the Palestinian population, the implications for a rise in noncommunicable diseases should be a major public health concern.

VL - 24 SN - 0149-5992 (Print)
0149-5992 (Linking) N1 - Abdul-Rahim, H F
Husseini, A
Bjertness, E
Giacaman, R
Gordon, N H
Jervell, J
United States
Diabetes care
Diabetes Care. 2001 Feb;24(2):275-9. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity and selected co-morbidities in an urban Palestinian population JF - Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord Y1 - 2001 A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. F. A1 - Abu-Rmeileh, N. M. A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Holmboe-Ottesen, G. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adult KW - Age Distribution KW - Aged KW - Arabs/*statistics & numerical data KW - Body Constitution KW - Body Mass Index KW - Diabetes Complications KW - Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology KW - Female KW - Humans KW - Hyperlipidemias/complications/epidemiology KW - Hypertension/complications/epidemiology KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Obesity/complications/*epidemiology KW - Prevalence KW - Sex Distribution KW - Sex Factors KW - Urban Health AB -

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of obesity and central obesity in an urban Palestinian population and their associations with selected co-morbidities, including diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional survey in an urban Palestinian community. SUBJECTS: Men and women aged 30-65 y residing in the urban community, excluding pregnant women. MEASUREMENTS: According to WHO guidelines, obesity for men and women was defined as BMI> or =30 kg x m(-2), while pre-obesity was defined as BMI 25-29.9 kg x m(-2). Central obesity was defined as a waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) of >0.90 in men and >0.85 in women. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity in this population was high at 41% (49% and 30% in women and men, respectively). Central obesity was more prevalent among men (59% compared to 25% in women). After adjusting for the effects of age, sex, smoking and each other, obesity and central obesity were found to be significantly associated with diabetes, low HDL-cholesterol and elevated triglycerides in separate logistic regression analyses. Central obesity was also significantly associated with hypertension (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.30-3.91). CONCLUSION: Obesity and central obesity are prevalent in the urban Palestinian population. Their associations with diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia point to a potential rise in cardiovascular disease (CVD). An understanding of the reasons behind the high prevalence of obesity is essential for its prevention as well as for the prevention of the morbidities to which it may lead.

VL - 25 SN - 0307-0565 (Print)
0307-0565 (Linking) N1 - Abdul-Rahim, H F
Abu-Rmeileh, N M
Husseini, A
Holmboe-Ottesen, G
Jervell, J
Bjertness, E
England
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Nov;25(11):1736-40. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in a rural Palestinian population JF - East Mediterr Health J Y1 - 2000 A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. A1 - Awartani, F. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adult KW - Age Distribution KW - Aged KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Diabetes Mellitus/blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology/prevention & control KW - Female KW - Glucose Intolerance/blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology/prevention & control KW - Health Planning KW - Humans KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Middle East/epidemiology KW - Population Surveillance KW - Prevalence KW - Risk Factors KW - Rural Health/*statistics & numerical data KW - Sex Distribution AB -

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance was investigated in a cross-sectional population-based study in a rural Palestinian population of 500 females and males aged 30-65 years. The prevalence of diabetes was 9.6% and 10.0% in females and males respectively. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance was 8.6%; 10.3% in females, 6.2% in males. The prevalence of total glucose intolerance (diabetes mellitus + impaired glucose tolerance) was 18.4%. Our study provides the first baseline data on diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in Palestine. The results indicate a high prevalence of glucose intolerance, information that is essential for the implementation of national planning and service provision.

VL - 6 SN - 1020-3397 (Print)
1020-3397 (Linking) N1 - Husseini, A
Abdul-Rahim, H
Awartani, F
Jervell, J
Bjertness, E
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Egypt
Eastern Mediterranean health journal = La revue de sante de la Mediterranee orientale = al-Majallah al-sihhiyah li-sharq al-mutawassit
East Mediterr Health J. 2000 Sep-Nov;6(5-6):1039-45. ER - TY - JOUR T1 - The utility of a single glucometer measurement of fasting capillary blood glucose in the prevalence determination of diabetes mellitus in an urban adult Palestinian population JF - Scand J Clin Lab Invest Y1 - 2000 A1 - Husseini, A. A1 - Abdul-Rahim, H. A1 - Awartani, F. A1 - Giacaman, R. A1 - Jervell, J. A1 - Bjertness, E. KW - Adult KW - Aged KW - Blood Glucose/*analysis KW - Diabetes Mellitus/blood/*epidemiology KW - Female KW - Glucose Tolerance Test KW - Humans KW - Israel/epidemiology KW - Male KW - Middle Aged KW - Population Surveillance KW - Predictive Value of Tests KW - Prevalence KW - Sensitivity and Specificity AB -

This paper aims to evaluate the utility of a single glucometer fasting capillary blood glucose (FCBG) measurement in determining the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a homogeneous adult population. FCBG measurements were compared with results of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 445 subjects aged 30-65 years in an urban cross-sectional study in Old Ramallah. Prevalence of diabetes, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated at different cut-off levels of FCBG, using OGTT as the reference. The prevalence of OGTT-diagnosed diabetes was 2.7%, while it varied considerably using different cut-off levels of FCBG. The sensitivity of a single glucometer (Exac Tech II) measurement of FCBG at the cut-off level of 6.7 mmol 1(-1) was 33.3%, with a specificity of 98.8%. Using the cut-off level of 6.1 mmol 1(-1) as suggested by the 1998 provisional report of a WHO consultation, the sensitivity increased to 41.7%. At a cut-off level of 5.6 mmol 1(-1), a sensitivity of 66.6% was reached, but the specificity decreased slightly. It can be concluded that a single glucometer measurement of FCBG in an adult population is not useful in determining the prevalence of diabetes mellitus.

VL - 60 SN - 0036-5513 (Print)
0036-5513 (Linking) N1 - Husseini, A
Abdul-Rahim, H
Awartani, F
Giacaman, R
Jervell, J
Bjertness, E
Comparative Study
Norway
Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2000 Oct;60(6):457-62. ER - TY - RPRT T1 - Health Education in the Context of National Liberation: A Case from Occupied Palestine Y1 - 1989 A1 - Moustafa Barghouti A1 - Rita Giacaman ER -